NAME | SYNOPSIS | DESCRIPTION | OUTPUT DESCRIPTION | EXAMPLES | FILES | SEE ALSO | COLOPHON

PCP-ATOPSAR(1)             General Commands Manual            PCP-ATOPSAR(1)

NAME         top

       pcp-atopsar - Advanced System Activity Report (pcp-atop related)

SYNOPSIS         top

       pcp [pcp options] atopsar [atop options] [-r file|date] [-h host] [-R
       cnt] [-b hh:mm] [-e hh:mm]
       pcp [pcp options] atopsar [atop options] interval [samples]

DESCRIPTION         top

       The pcp-atopsar program can be used to report statistics at the
       system level.

       In the first synopsis line (no sampling interval specified), pcp-
       atopsar extracts data from a raw logfile that has been recorded
       previously by pmlogger(1) (or via the -w option of the pcp-atop
       program).
       You can specify the name of the logfile with the -r option of the
       pcp-atopsar program.  When a pmlogger daily logfile is used, named
       $PCP_LOG_DIR/pmlogger/[host]/YYYYMMDD (where YYYYMMDD reflects the
       date), the required date of the form YYYYMMDD can be specified with
       the -r option instead of the filename, or the symbolic name 'y' can
       be used for yesterday's daily logfile (this can be repeated so 'yyyy'
       indicates the logfile of four days ago).  If the -r option is not
       specified at all, today's daily logfile is used by default.
       By default, the hostname of the localhost will be used when resolving
       pmlogger archives, however an alternative host can be specified using
       the -h option.
       The starting and ending times of the report can be defined using the
       options -b and -e followed by a time argument of the form hh:mm.

       In the second synopsis line, pcp-atopsar reads actual activity
       counters from the kernel with the specified interval (in seconds) and
       the specified number of samples (optionally).  When pcp-atopsar is
       activated in this way it immediately sends the output for every
       requested report to standard output.  If only one type of report is
       requested, the header is printed once and after every interval
       seconds the statistical counters are shown for that period.  If
       several reports are requested, a header is printed per sample
       followed by the statistical counters for that period.

       When invoked via the pcp(1) command, the PCPIntro(1) options
       -h/--host, -a/--archive, -O/--origin, -s/--samples, -t/--interval,
       -Z/--timezone and several other pcp options become indirectly
       available.

       Some generic flags can be specified to influence the behaviour of the
       pcp-atopsar program:

       -S   By default the timestamp at the beginning of a line is
            suppressed if more lines are shown for one interval. With this
            flag a timestamp is given for every output-line (easier for
            post-processing).

       -a   By default certain resources as disks and network interfaces are
            only shown when they were active during the interval.  With this
            flag all resources of a given type are shown, even if they were
            inactive during the interval.

       -x   By default pcp-atopsar only uses colors if output is directed to
            a terminal (window).  These colors might indicate that a
            critical occupation percentage has been reached (red) or has
            been almost reached (cyan) for a particular resource.  See the
            man-page of atop for a detailed description of this feature
            (section COLORS).
            With the flag -x the use of colors is suppressed
            unconditionally.

       -C   By default pcp-atopsar only uses colors if output is directed to
            a terminal (window).  These colors might indicate that a
            critical occupation percentage has been reached (red) or has
            been almost reached (cyan) for a particular resource.  See the
            man-page of atop for a detailed description of this feature
            (section COLORS).
            With the flag -C colors will always be used, even if output is
            not directed to a terminal.

       -M   Use markers at the end of a line to indicate that a critical
            occupation percentage has been reached ('*') or has been almost
            reached ('+') for particular resources. The marker '*' is
            similar to the color red and the marker '+' to the color cyan.
            See the man-page of atop for a detailed description of these
            colors (section COLORS).

       -H   Repeat the header line within a report for every N detail lines.
            The value of N is determined dynamically in case of output to a
            tty/window (depending on the number of lines); for output to a
            file or pipe this value is 23.

       -R   Summarize cnt samples into one sample. When the logfile contains
            e.g. samples of 10 minutes, the use of the flag '-R 6' shows a
            report with one sample for every hour.

       Other flags are used to define which reports are required:

       -A   Show all possible reports.

       -c   Report about CPU utilization (in total and per cpu).

       -p   Report about processor-related matters, like load-averages and
            hardware interrupts.

       -P   Report about processes.

       -m   Current memory- and swap-occupation.

       -s   Report about paging- and swapping-activity, and overcommitment.

       -l   Report about utilization of logical volumes.

       -f   Report about utilization of multiple devices.

       -d   Report about utilization of disks.

       -n   Report about NFS mounted filesystems on NFS client.

       -j   Report about NFS client activity.

       -J   Report about NFS server activity.

       -i   Report about the network interfaces.

       -I   Report about errors for network-interfaces.

       -w   Report about IP version 4 network traffic.

       -W   Report about errors for IP version 4 traffic.

       -y   General report about ICMP version 4 layer activity.

       -Y   Per-type report about ICMP version 4 layer activity.

       -u   Report about UDP version 4 network traffic.

       -z   Report about IP version 6 network traffic.

       -Z   Report about errors for IP version 6 traffic.

       -k   General report about ICMP version 6 layer activity.

       -K   Per-type report about ICMP version 6 layer activity.

       -U   Report about UDP version 6 network traffic.

       -t   Report about TCP network traffic.

       -T   Report about errors for TCP-traffic.

       -O   Report about top-3 processes consuming most processor capacity.
            This report is only available when using a log file (not when
            specifying an interval).

       -G   Report about top-3 processes consuming most resident memory.
            This report is only available when using a log file (not when
            specifying an interval).

       -D   Report about top-3 processes issueing most disk transfers.  This
            report is only available when using a log file (not when
            specifying an interval).

       -N   Report about top-3 processes issueing most IPv4/IPv6 socket
            transfers.  This report is only available when using a log file
            (not when specifying an interval).

OUTPUT DESCRIPTION         top

       Depending on the requested report, a number of columns with output
       values are produced.  The values are mostly presented as a number of
       events per second.

       The output for the flag -c contains the following columns per cpu:

       usr%        Percentage of cpu-time consumed in user mode (program
                   text) for all active processes running with a nice value
                   of zero (default) or a negative nice value (which means a
                   higher priority than usual).  The cpu consumption in user
                   mode of processes with a nice value larger than zero
                   (lower priority) is indicated in the nice%-column.

       nice%       Percentage of cpu time consumed in user mode (i.e.
                   program text) for all processes running witn a nice value
                   larger than zero (which means with a lower priority than
                   average).

       sys%        Percentage of cpu time consumed in system mode (kernel
                   text) for all active processes. A high percentage usually
                   indicates a lot of system calls being issued.

       irq%        Percentage of cpu time consumed for handling of device
                   interrupts.

       softirq%    Percentage of cpu time consumed for soft interrupt
                   handling.

       steal%      Percentage of cpu time stolen by other virtual machines
                   running on the same hardware.

       guest%      Percentage of cpu time used by other virtual machines
                   running on the same hardware (overlaps with usr%/nice%).

       wait%       Percentage of unused cpu time while at least one of the
                   processes in wait-state awaits completion of disk I/O.

       idle%       Percentage of unused cpu time because all processes are
                   in a wait-state but not waiting for disk-I/O.

       The output for the flag -p contains the following values:

       pswch/s     Number of process switches (also called context switches)
                   per second on this cpu. A process switch occurs at the
                   moment that an active thread (i.e.  the thread using a
                   cpu) enters a wait state or has used its time slice
                   completely; another thread will then be chosen to use the
                   cpu.

       devintr/s   Number of hardware interrupts handled per second on this
                   cpu.

       clones/s    The number of new threads started per second.

       loadavg1    Load average reflecting the average number of threads in
                   the runqueue or in non-interruptible wait state (usually
                   waiting for disk or tape I/O) during the last minute.

       loadavg5    Load average reflecting the average number of threads in
                   the runqueue or in non-interruptible wait state (usually
                   waiting for disk or tape I/O) during the last 5 minutes.

       loadavg15   Load average reflecting the average number of threads in
                   the runqueue or in non-interruptible wait state (usually
                   waiting for disk or tape I/O) during the last 15 minutes.

       The output for the flag -P contains information about the processes
       and threads:

       clones/s    The number of new threads started per second.

       pexit/s

       curproc     Total number of processes present in the system.

       curzomb     Number of zombie processes present in the system.

       thrrun      Total number of threads present in the system in state
                   'running'.

       thrslpi     Total number of threads present in the system in state
                   'interruptible sleeping'.

       thrslpu     Total number of threads present in the system in state
                   'uninterruptible sleeping'.

       The output for the flag -m contains information about the memory- and
       swap-utilization:

       memtotal    Total usable main memory size.

       memfree     Available main memory size at this moment (snapshot).

       buffers     Main memory used at this moment to cache metadata-blocks
                   (snapshot).

       cached      Main memory used at this moment to cache data-blocks
                   (snapshot).

       dirty       Amount of memory in the page cache that still has to be
                   flushed to disk at this moment (snapshot).

       slabmem     Main memory used at this moment for dynamically allocated
                   memory by the kernel (snapshot).

       swptotal    Total swap space size at this moment (snapshot).

       swpfree     Available swap space at this moment (snapshot).

       The output for the flag -s contains information about the frequency
       of swapping:

       pagescan/s  Number of scanned pages per second due to the fact that
                   free memory drops below a particular threshold.

       swapin/s    The number of memory-pages the system read from the swap-
                   device per second.

       swapout/s   The number of memory-pages the system wrote to the swap-
                   device per second.

       commitspc   The committed virtual memory space i.e.  the reserved
                   virtual space for all allocations of private memory space
                   for processes.

       commitlim   The maximum limit for the committed space, which is by
                   default swap size plus 50% of memory size.  The kernel
                   only verifies whether the committed space exceeds the
                   limit if strict overcommit handling is configured
                   (vm.overcommit_memory is 2).

       The output for the flags -l (LVM), -f (MD), and -d (hard disk)
       contains the following columns per active unit:

       disk        Name.

       busy        Busy-percentage of the unit (i.e. the portion of time
                   that the device was busy handling requests).

       read/s      Number of read-requests issued per second on this unit.

       KB/read     Average number of Kbytes transferred per read-request for
                   this unit.

       writ/s      Number of write-requests issued per second on this unit.

       KB/writ     Average number of Kbytes transferred per write-request
                   for this unit.

       avque       Average number of requests outstanding in the queue
                   during the time that the unit is busy.

       avserv      Average number of milliseconds needed by a request on
                   this unit (seek, latency and data-transfer).

       The output for the flag -n contains information about activity on NFS
       mounted filesystems (client):

       mounted_device
                   Mounted device containing server name and server
                   directory being mounted.

       physread/s  Kilobytes data physically read from the NFS server by
                   processes running on the NFS client.

       KBwrite/s   Kilobytes data physically written to the NFS server by
                   processes running on the NFS client.
                   When the NFS filesystem was mounted during the interval,
                   the state 'M' is shown.

       The output for the flag -j contains information about NFS client
       activity:

       rpc/s       Number of RPC calls per second issued to NFS server(s).

       rpcread/s   Number of read RPC calls per second issued to NFS
                   server(s).

       rpcwrite/s  Number of write RPC calls per second issued to NFS
                   server(s).

       retrans/s   Number of retransmitted RPC calls per second.

       autrefresh/s
                   Number of authorization refreshes per second.

       The output for the flag -J contains information about NFS server
       activity:

       rpc/s       Number of RPC calls per second received from NFS
                   client(s).

       rpcread/s   Number of read RPC calls per second received from NFS
                   client(s).

       rpcwrite/s  Number of write RPC calls per second received from NFS
                   client(s).

       MBcr/s      Number of Megabytes per second returned to read requests
                   by clients.

       MBcw/s      Number of Megabytes per second passed in write requests
                   by clients.

       nettcp/s    Number of requests per second handled via TCP.

       netudp/s    Number of requests per second handled via UDP.

       The output for the flag -i provides information about utilization of
       network interfaces:

       interf      Name of interface.

       busy        Busy percentage for this interface.  If the linespeed of
                   this interface could not be determined (e.g. for virtual
                   interfaces), a question mark is shown.

       ipack/s     Number of packets received from this interface per
                   second.

       opack/s     Number of packets transmitted to this interface per
                   second.

       iKbyte/s    Number of Kbytes received from this interface per second.

       oKbyte/s    Number of Kbytes transmitted via this interface per
                   second.

       imbps/s     Effective number of megabits received per second.

       ombps/s     Effective number of megabits transmitted per second.

       maxmbps/s   Linespeed as number of megabits per second.  If the
                   linespeed could not be determined (e.g. virtual
                   interfaces), value 0 is shown.
                   The linespeed is followed by the indication 'f' (full
                   duplex) or 'h' (half duplex).

       The output for the flag -I provides information about the failures
       that were detected for network interfaces:

       interf      Name of interface.

       ierr/s      Number of bad packets received from this interface per
                   second.

       oerr/s      Number of times that packet transmission to this
                   interface failed per second.

       coll/s      Number of collisions encountered per second while
                   transmitting packets.

       idrop/s     Number of received packets dropped per second due to lack
                   of buffer-space in the local system.

       odrop/s     Number of transmitted packets dropped per second due to
                   lack of buffer-space in the local system.

       iframe/s    Number of frame alignment-errors encountered per second
                   on received packets.

       ocarrier/s  Number of carrier-errors encountered per second on
                   transmitted packets.

       The output for the flag -w provides information about the utilization
       of the IPv4-layer (formal SNMP-names between brackets):

       inrecv/s    Number of IP datagrams received from interfaces per
                   second, including those received in error (ipInReceives).

       outreq/s    Number of IP datagrams that local higher-layer protocols
                   supplied to IP in requests for transmission per second
                   (ipOutRequests).

       indeliver/s Number of received IP datagrams that have been
                   successfully delivered to higher protocol-layers per
                   second (ipInDelivers).

       forward/s   Number of received IP datagrams per second for which this
                   entity was not their final IP destination, as a result of
                   which an attempt was made to forward (ipForwDatagrams).

       reasmok/s   Number of IP datagrams successfully reassembled per
                   second (ipReasmOKs).

       fragcreat/s Number of IP datagram fragments generated per second at
                   this entity (ipFragCreates).

       The output for the flag -W provides information about the failures
       that were detected in the IPv4-layer (formal SNMP-names between
       brackets):

       in: dsc/s   Number of input IP datagrams per second for which no
                   problems were encountered to prevent their continued
                   processing but that were discarded, e.g. for lack of
                   buffer space (ipInDiscards).

       in: hder/s  Number of input IP datagrams per second discarded due to
                   errors in the IP header (ipInHdrErrors).

       in: ader/s  Number of input IP datagrams per second discarded because
                   the IP address in the destination field was not valid to
                   be received by this entity (ipInAddrErrors).

       in: unkp/s  Number of inbound packets per second that were discarded
                   because of an unknown or unsupported protocol
                   (ipInUnknownProtos).

       in: ratim/s Number of timeout-situations per second while other
                   fragments were expected for successful reassembly
                   (ipReasmTimeout).

       in: rfail/s Number of failures detected per second by the IP
                   reassembly algorithm (ipReasmFails).

       out: dsc/s  Number of output IP datagrams per second for which no
                   problems were encountered to prevent their continued
                   processing but that were discarded, e.g. for lack of
                   buffer space (ipOutDiscards).

       out: nrt/s  Number of IP datagrams per second discarded because no
                   route could be found (ipOutNoRoutes).

       The output for the flag -y provides information about the general
       utilization of the ICMPv4-layer and some information per type of
       ICMP-message (formal SNMP-names between brackets):

       intot/s     Number of ICMP messages (any type) received per second at
                   this entity (icmpInMsgs).

       outtot/s    Number of ICMP messages (any type) transmitted per second
                   from this entity (icmpOutMsgs).

       inecho/s    Number of ICMP Echo (request) messages received per
                   second (icmpInEchos).

       inerep/s    Number of ICMP Echo-Reply messages received per second
                   (icmpInEchoReps).

       otecho/s    Number of ICMP Echo (request) messages transmitted per
                   second (icmpOutEchos).

       oterep/s    Number of ICMP Echo-Reply messages transmitted per second
                   (icmpOutEchoReps).

       The output for the flag -Y provides information about other types of
       ICMPv4-messages (formal SNMP-names between brackets):

       ierr/s      Number of ICMP messages received per second but
                   determined to have ICMP-specific errors (icmpInErrors).

       isq/s       Number of ICMP Source Quench messages received per second
                   (icmpInSrcQuenchs).

       ird/s       Number of ICMP Redirect messages received per second
                   (icmpInRedirects).

       idu/s       Number of ICMP Destination Unreachable messages received
                   per second (icmpInDestUnreachs).

       ite/s       Number of ICMP Time Exceeded messages received per second
                   (icmpOutTimeExcds).

       oerr/s      Number of ICMP messages transmitted per second but
                   determined to have ICMP-specific errors (icmpOutErrors).

       osq/s       Number of ICMP Source Quench messages transmitted per
                   second (icmpOutSrcQuenchs).

       ord/s       Number of ICMP Redirect messages transmitted per second
                   (icmpOutRedirects).

       odu/s       Number of ICMP Destination Unreachable messages
                   transmitted per second (icmpOutDestUnreachs).

       ote/s       Number of ICMP Time Exceeded messages transmitted per
                   second (icmpOutTimeExcds).

       The output for the flag -u provides information about the utilization
       of the UDPv4-layer (formal SNMP-names between brackets):

       indgram/s   Number of UDP datagrams per second delivered to UDP users
                   (udpInDatagrams).

       outdgram/s  Number of UDP datagrams transmitted per second from this
                   entity (udpOutDatagrams).

       inerr/s     Number of received UDP datagrams per second that could
                   not be delivered for reasons other than the lack of an
                   application at the destination port (udpInErrors).

       noport/s    Number of received UDP datagrams per second for which
                   there was no application at the destination port
                   (udpNoPorts).

       The output for the flag -z provides information about the utilization
       of the IPv6-layer (formal SNMP-names between brackets):

       inrecv/s    Number of input IPv6-datagrams received from interfaces
                   per second, including those received in error
                   (ipv6IfStatsInReceives).

       outreq/s    Number of IPv6-datagrams per second that local higher-
                   layer protocols supplied to IP in requests for
                   transmission (ipv6IfStatsOutRequests).  This counter does
                   not include any forwarded datagrams.

       inmc/s      Number of multicast packets per second that have been
                   received by the interface (ipv6IfStatsInMcastPkts).

       outmc/s     Number of multicast packets per second that have been
                   transmitted to the interface (ipv6IfStatsOutMcastPkts).

       indeliv/s   Number of IP datagrams successfully delivered per second
                   to IPv6 user-protocols, including ICMP
                   (ipv6IfStatsInDelivers).

       reasmok/s   Number of IPv6 datagrams successfully reassembled per
                   second (ipv6IfStatsReasmOKs).

       fragcre/s   Number of IPv6 datagram fragments generated per second at
                   this entity (ipv6IfStatsOutFragCreates).

       The output for the flag -Z provides information about the failures
       that were detected in the IPv6-layer (formal SNMP-names between
       brackets):

       in: dsc/s   Number of input IPv6 datagrams per second for which no
                   problems were encountered to prevent their continued
                   processing but that were discarded, e.g. for lack of
                   buffer space (ipv6IfStatsInDiscards).

       in: hder/s  Number of input datagrams per second discarded due to
                   errors in the IPv6 header (ipv6IfStatsInHdrErrors).

       in: ader/s  Number of input datagrams per second discarded because
                   the IPv6 address in the destination field was not valid
                   to be received by this entity (ipv6IfStatsInAddrErrors).

       in: unkp/s  Number of locally-addressed datagrams per second that
                   were discarded because of an unknown or unsupported
                   protocol (ipv6IfStatsInUnknownProtos).

       in: ratim/s Number of timeout-situations per second while other IPv6
                   fragments were expected for successful reassembly
                   (ipv6ReasmTimeout).

       in: rfail/s Number of failures detected per second by the IPv6
                   reassembly-algorithm (ipv6IfStatsReasmFails).

       out: dsc/s  Number of output IPv6 datagrams per second for which no
                   problems were encountered to prevent their continued
                   processing but that were discarded, e.g. for lack of
                   buffer space (ipv6IfStatsOutDiscards).

       out: nrt/s  Number of IPv6 datagrams per second discarded because no
                   route could be found (ipv6IfStatsInNoRoutes).

       The output for the flag -k provides information about the general
       utilization of the ICMPv6-layer and some information per type of
       ICMP-message (formal SNMP-names between brackets):

       intot/s     Number of ICMPv6 messages (any type) received per second
                   at the interface (ipv6IfIcmpInMsgs).

       outtot/s    Number of ICMPv6 messages (any type) transmitted per
                   second from this entity (ipv6IfIcmpOutMsgs).

       inerr/s     Number of ICMPv6 messages received per second that had
                   ICMP-specific errors, such as bad ICMP checksums, bad
                   length, etc (ipv6IfIcmpInErrors).

       innsol/s    Number of ICMP Neighbor Solicit messages received per
                   second (ipv6IfIcmpInNeighborSolicits).

       innadv/s    Number of ICMP Neighbor Advertisement messages received
                   per second (ipv6IfIcmpInNeighborAdvertisements).

       otnsol/s    Number of ICMP Neighbor Solicit messages transmitted per
                   second (ipv6IfIcmpOutNeighborSolicits).

       otnadv/s    Number of ICMP Neighbor Advertisement messages
                   transmitted per second
                   (ipv6IfIcmpOutNeighborAdvertisements).

       The output for the flag -K provides information about other types of
       ICMPv6-messages (formal SNMP-names between brackets):

       iecho/s     Number of ICMP Echo (request) messages received per
                   second (ipv6IfIcmpInEchos).

       ierep/s     Number of ICMP Echo-Reply messages received per second
                   (ipv6IfIcmpInEchoReplies).

       oerep/s     Number of ICMP Echo-Reply messages transmitted per second
                   (ipv6IfIcmpOutEchoReplies).

       idu/s       Number of ICMP Destination Unreachable messages received
                   per second (ipv6IfIcmpInDestUnreachs).

       odu/s       Number of ICMP Destination Unreachable messages
                   transmitted per second (ipv6IfIcmpOutDestUnreachs).

       ird/s       Number of ICMP Redirect messages received per second
                   (ipv6IfIcmpInRedirects).

       ord/s       Number of ICMP Redirect messages transmitted per second
                   (ipv6IfIcmpOutRedirect).

       ite/s       Number of ICMP Time Exceeded messages received per second
                   (ipv6IfIcmpInTimeExcds).

       ote/s       Number of ICMP Time Exceeded messages transmitted per
                   second (ipv6IfIcmpOutTimeExcds).

       The output for the flag -U provides information about the utilization
       of the UDPv6-layer (formal SNMP-names between brackets):

       indgram/s   Number of UDPv6 datagrams per second delivered to UDP
                   users (udpInDatagrams),

       outdgram/s  Number of UDPv6 datagrams transmitted per second from
                   this entity (udpOutDatagrams),

       inerr/s     Number of received UDPv6 datagrams per second that could
                   not be delivered for reasons other than the lack of an
                   application at the destination port (udpInErrors).

       noport/s    Number of received UDPv6 datagrams per second for which
                   there was no application at the destination port
                   (udpNoPorts).

       The output for the flag -t provides information about the utilization
       of the TCP-layer (formal SNMP-names between brackets):

       insegs/s    Number of received segments per second, including those
                   received in error (tcpInSegs).

       outsegs/s   Number of transmitted segments per second, excluding
                   those containing only retransmitted octets (tcpOutSegs).

       actopen/s   Number of active opens per second that have been
                   supported by this entity (tcpActiveOpens).

       pasopen/s   Number of passive opens per second that have been
                   supported by this entity (tcpPassiveOpens).

       nowopen     Number of connections currently open (snapshot), for
                   which the state is either ESTABLISHED or CLOSE-WAIT
                   (tcpCurrEstab).

       The output for the flag -T provides information about the failures
       that were detected in the TCP-layer (formal SNMP-names between
       brackets):

       inerr/s     Number of received segments per second received in error
                   (tcpInErrs).

       retrans/s   Number of retransmitted segments per second
                   (tcpRetransSegs).

       attfail/s   Number of failed connection attempts per second that have
                   occurred at this entity (tcpAttemptFails).

       estabreset/s
                   Number of resets per second that have occurred at this
                   entity (tcpEstabResets).

       outreset/s  Number of transmitted segments per second containing the
                   RST flag (tcpOutRsts).

       The output for the flag -O provides information about the top-3 of
       processes with the highest processor consumption:

       pid         Process-id (if zero, the process has exited while the pid
                   could not be determined).

       command     The name of the process.

       cpu%        The percentage of cpu-capacity being consumed.  This
                   value can exceed 100% for a multithreaded process running
                   on a multiprocessor machine.

       The output for the flag -G provides information about the top-3 of
       processes with the highest memory consumption:

       pid         Process-id (if zero, the process has exited while the pid
                   could not be determined).

       command     The name of the process.

       mem%        The percentage of resident memory-utilization by this
                   process.

       The output for the flag -D provides information about the top-3 of
       processes that issue the most read and write accesses to disk:

       pid         Process-id (if zero, the process has exited while the pid
                   could not be determined).

       command     The name of the process.

       dsk%        The percentage of read and write accesses related to the
                   total number of read and write accesses issued on disk by
                   all processes, so a high percentage does not imply a high
                   disk load on system level.

       The output for the flag -N provides information about the top-3 of
       processes that issue the most socket transfers for IPv4/IPv6:

       pid         Process-id (if zero, the process has exited while the pid
                   could not be determined).

       command     The name of the process.

       net%        The percentage of socket transfers related to the total
                   number of transfers issued by all processes, so a high
                   percentage does not imply a high network load on system
                   level.

EXAMPLES         top

       To see today's cpu-activity so far (supposed that atop is logging in
       the background):

         pcp-atopsar

       To see the memory occupation for June 5, 2012 between 10:00 and 12:30
       (supposed that pmlogger has been logging daily in the background on
       host acme.com):

         pcp-atopsar -m -r $PCP_LOG_DIR/pmlogger/acme.com/20120605 -b 10:00
       -e 12:30

                       or

         pcp-atopsar -m -r 20120605 -b 10:00 -e 12:30

                       or, suppose it is June 8, 2012 at this moment

         pcp-atopsar -m -r yyy -b 10:00 -e 12:30

       Write a logfile with atop to record the system behaviour for 30
       minutes (30 samples of one minute) and produce all available reports
       afterwards:

         pcp-atop -w /tmp/atoplog 60 30

         pcp-atopsar -A -r /tmp/atoplog

       To watch TCP activity evolve for ten minutes (10 samples with sixty
       seconds interval):

         pcp-atopsar -t 60 10

       To watch the header-lines ('_' as last character) of all reports with
       only the detail-lines showing critical resource consumption (marker
       '*' or '+' as last character):

         pcp-atopsar -AM | grep '[_*+]$'

FILES         top

       /etc/atoprc
            Configuration file containing system-wide default values (mainly
            flags).  See related man-page.

       ~/.atoprc
            Configuration file containing personal default values (mainly
            flags).  See related man-page.

       $PCP_LOG_DIR/pmlogger/HOST/YYYYMMDD
            Daily data file, where YYYYMMDD are digits representing the
            date, and HOST is the hostname of the machine being logged.

SEE ALSO         top

       pcp(1), pcp-atop(1), mkaf(1), pmlogger(1), pmlogger_daily(1),
       PCPIntro(1) and pcp-atoprc(5).

COLOPHON         top

       This page is part of the PCP (Performance Co-Pilot) project.
       Information about the project can be found at ⟨http://www.pcp.io/⟩.
       If you have a bug report for this manual page, send it to
       pcp@oss.sgi.com.  This page was obtained from the project's upstream
       Git repository ⟨git://git.pcp.io/pcp⟩ on 2017-07-05.  If you discover
       any rendering problems in this HTML version of the page, or you
       believe there is a better or more up-to-date source for the page, or
       you have corrections or improvements to the information in this
       COLOPHON (which is not part of the original manual page), send a mail
       to man-pages@man7.org

Performance Co-Pilot                 PCP                      PCP-ATOPSAR(1)

Pages that refer to this page: pcp-atop(1)pcp-atoprc(5)